Canadian Pipline Protests

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/article-where-are-the-solidarity-protests-for-the-first-nations-that-support/

Where are the solidarity protests for the First Nations that support Coastal GasLink?

The demonstrations you’re thinking of – such as this one seen on Feb. 8, 2020 – were in solidarity with Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs, who oppose the $6-billion, 670-kilometre pipeline across northern B.C. It’s

Dirk Meissner/The Canadian Press

There have been no major demonstrations this week in solidarity with the First Nations people along the Coastal GasLink route who are waiting for change to come to their communities.

There have been no blockades disrupting VIA Rail trains; nothing in midtown Toronto; no one outside the B.C. Legislature; no disruptions on the Reconciliation Bridge in Calgary; no stopping of traffic in downtown Ottawa; and no protests along busy Vancouver intersections.

The demonstrations you’re thinking of were in solidarity with Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs, who oppose the $6-billion, 670-kilometre pipeline across northern B.C. It’s their slogans that have been broadly adopted, their opinions that are being mirrored in protest and their case that has been taken up so fervently by supporters all across Canada.

Wet’suwet’en chiefs vs. Coastal GasLink: A guide to the dispute over a B.C. pipeline

Opinion: What is happening on Wet’suwet’en territory shows us that reconciliation is dead

The voices of band members from 20 First Nations along the Coastal GasLink project route who want it to continue – those who have indicated, through elections or other means, that they want construction on the natural gas pipeline to move ahead – have been eclipsed by the views of a small group of Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs, who hold jurisdiction over just a portion of the land the pipeline will cover.

 

The inconvenient truth for pipeline supporters: root causes of this revolution will not be televised

https://www.straight.com/news/1360051/inconvenient-truth-pipeline-supporters

That’s to say nothing of the importance of the Unist’ot’en Healing Center in decolonizing Wet’suwet’en people by reconnecting them to the land.

Here’s another inconvenient truth: there’s probably never been a pipeline project in Canada that the vast majority of Postmedia columnists haven’t adored.

In 1970, musician Gil Scott-Heron recorded “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised”—and the slogan’s origins date back to the Black Power movement of the 1960s.

In a similar manner, those rebelling against the fossil-fuel industry shouldn’t expect to see sympathetic treatment from media outlets in these rebellious times.

That’s because the root causes of this climate and Indigenous revolution will not be televised. To borrow a phrase from Scott-Heron, this revolution will be live

 

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