Indian Country’s COVID-19 syllabus

https://indiancountrytoday.com/news/indian-country-s-covid-19-syllabus-EiN-p5Q-XkW-smnaebJV6Q

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez and Vice President Myron Lizer met with the Chinle Service Unit Command Team and Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) Region 9 representatives Josh Allan and Ricardo Zuniga on March 31, 2020 to evaluate local facilities in Chinle, Arizona, to discuss the establishment of a federal medical station to help fight the spread of COVID-19. (Photo courtesy of Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez and Vice President Myron Lizer, Facebook)

Indian Country Today

Data, story summaries, lists of closures, resources
Indian Country Today

COVID-19 Tracker in the United States

April 16, 2020 9:15 pm EDT

Cases confirmed in the Indian health system: 1,397

Total deaths in the Indian health system: 55

*** Report COVID-19 cases in your tribe on this Google Form ***

(Confirmed by tribes, the Indian Health Service, state public health agencies or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
(Only updated once a day, Monday through Friday)

April 16, 2020 9:15 pm EDT

Total cases: 632,548 (632,220 confirmed; 348 probable)

Total deaths: 31,071 (26,930 confirmed; 4,141 probable)

COVID-19 Tracker around the world

April 16, 2020 9:15 pm EDT by the World Health Organization

Total cases confirmed: 1,995,983
Deaths: 131,037
213 countries

Indian Country Today story syllabus

Stories that have been posted by Indian Country Today

New life of a trucker: Less traffic. More hours. And so much kindness

Native truck drivers across the U.S. report similar changes tied to the pandemic: long shifts, extra precautions, fewer wrecks and more “thank yous.”

A scary, global race to get home

Good news: Two Phoenix-area women who were living in the U.K. when coronavirus cases began skyrocketing in Europe say they’re relieved to be back with family

Two pueblos have some of the highest infection rates in US

Two pueblos in New Mexico have some of the highest infection rates in the United States. The numbers are stark. Zia Pueblo has 31 confirmed positive cases with a population of 900 people. And San Felipe has 52 cases with a population of 2,200.

Federal rules: Tribal casinos are ineligible for payroll help

‘Congress said ‘any’ small business can get paycheck protection for its people, the SBA has no right to say anything less to small tribal gaming businesses’

‘It’s hard when you love something’

COVID-19 pandemic threatens health in Alaska Native villages and the thousands of workers who usually arrive for the short, lucrative Bristol Bay fishery.

Adorable participants in regalia win the internet

Jayda saw her auntie Tanisha do a #DontRushChallenge video and wanted to do one with her cousins. The result was a well-deserved viral video

‘This is a matter of life and death’

Navajo Nation is an Indian Country COVID-19 hotspot, as medical supplies are dwindling nationally. A summary of COVID-19-related news for Saturday April 4, 2020

Alaska villages ‘scrambling’ after losing essential air service

Ravn Air carried passengers, food, freight and mail to more than 120 communities announced it’s ending service to all but 11 villages. Ravn Air sent the message at 6 a.m. telling employees to stop operations that day.

Governor tells president: ‘Incredible spikes’ could ‘wipe out tribal nations’

New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham said there are “’incredible spikes” of coronavirus cases in the Navajo Nation and that the virus could “wipe out” some tribal nations, according to a recording of a call between Trump and the nation’s governors obtained by ABC News.

“We’re seeing incredible spikes in the Navajo Nation, and this is going to be an issue where we’re going to have to figure that out and think about maybe testing and surveillance opportunities,” Grisham said.

Indian Country Today Reporters’ Roundtable, March 30

‘It is also our tradition to protect our people,’ the canoes will wait

Another Monday. Another tranche of global COVID-19 cases on National Doctors Day. There are now more than 122,000 cases in the United States, resulting in 2,112 deaths. And in Indian Country there are 190 cases with at least 10 deaths confirmed.

The Lummi Nation in Washington state reported the sharpest increase so far this week. There are now 16 positive cases, 12 of them being Lummi citizens, and nine people who live on the Lummi Reservation. Two of the cases include members of the Lummi Business Council. The identified cases are likely to go up — there are 22 more cases pending, according to the tribe’s public health department.

Youth and Elders test positive for COVID-19 amid calls for donations

Meskwaki Nation among others in Indian Country with confirmed cases

Weekends are usually days when people take time off. Not these days as the number of positive coronavirus cases continue to grow in Indian Country. Over the weekend, tribal nations reported new numbers, instituted new curfews and organizations asked for more donations to send to both students and community members. Others used this time to connect on social media. In Iowa, a 31-year-old Meskwaki woman was confirmed positive for the virus, the Times Republican reported. She has been identified as Lindsey Johnson.

Help is on the way? Depends on the type of small business

‘Three weeks ago we were doing great! And now we’re done.’

It’s a sparse lunch crowd at the Bee Line Cafe in Payson, Arizona. Only four tables have guests seated and eating. Business has slowed considerably in the past week says owner Kassie Sexton.“People are not wanting to come in because they’re afraid they’re going to get cooties.” She laughs nervously as she looks around her nearly empty cafe.

Billion dollar plus for Indian health (is a start) for coronavirus response

Associated Press

The sweeping bill that President Donald Trump signed will help better equip health care systems that serve Native Americans, improve the emergency response time on tribal lands, provide economic relief for tribal members, and help with food deliveries to low-income families and the elderly.

Tribes have been lobbying Congress to help address shortfalls in an already underfunded health care system and to ensure the federal government fulfills its obligation to them under treaties and other acts. While the $10 billion for tribes in the $2.2 trillion package is less than they requested, tribes say it represents progress.

Indian Country’s daily coronavirus update: 103,321 cases now in the U.S.

The number of coronavirus cases is growing globally.

On Saturday, 103,321 cases were reported in the United States by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, making the U.S. the country with the highest number of confirmed cases and 1,668 people have died from coronavirus-related complications.

Italy’s death toll from the coronavirus pandemic is the highest in the world, with over 10,000 fatalities.

COVID-19 financial strain? Here are resources in 50 states

Federal and state services include monetary and food assistance, unemployment benefits, and more. The National Retail Federation also has over 70 corporations looking for workers

Minnesota tribes affected by stay-at-home order

Updated: New coronavirus cases on the Navajo Nation have increased by 20 on Wednesday, from 49 to 69

Tribes in Minnesota are the latest across Indian Country to fall under a statewide stay-at-home order in the fight to prevent the coronavirus spread.Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz signed an executive order on Wednesday ordering Minnesota residents in nonessential jobs to stay at home. The order begins midnight Friday and is scheduled to run through April 10.

Senate vote expected; $8 billion for tribes

The Senate and White House reached an agreement on the bailout funds for America, the largest in history. The $2 trillion relief package includes $8 billion for tribal governments and $2 billion for emergency supplemental funding for federal Indian programs.

The Senate vote on the agreement is set to happen this afternoon. Even if passed by the Senate, they would need House approval.

Bad news: ‘It’s likely to get worse’

Two Arizona tribes in the Phoenix valley see their first COVID-19 cases while the Navajo Nation adds 20 more reports. The Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community reported its first case and the Gila River Indian Community has two positive cases.

These new cases bring the total number of COVID-19 cases in the Indian health system to 64 and two deaths. Eight out of 10 deaths due to the coronavirus in the U.S. have been people 65 and older, according to the CDC.

Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community President Martin Harvier made the announcement Tuesday afternoon on the tribal government’s Facebook page.

Alaska, Hawaii order mandatory quarantines

Generations and generations … have had to deal with these pandemics and these viruses, and they’ve also had to get up in the morning and feed themselves, and make things run for society’

Alaska Governor Mike Dunleavy announced a mandatory 14-day quarantine for people arriving from out of state to slow the spread of COVID-19. On Sunday Hawaii Governor David Ing took the action for travelers headed there.

Shake hands? A hug? People don’t seem ready to change

Surgeon General: ‘America … It’s going to get bad’

This morning U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams said on national television, “I want America to understand this week, it’s going to get bad.” As if he needed proof, the number of positive cases for COVID-19 listed on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention doubled over the weekend. There are now 33,404 cases and 400 people across the country have died.

Ammo & fuel for hunters to feed others

‘We’re just going to get in front of the things that may come up’

Some tribes are postponing powwows, closing casinos, and commanding their employees to work from home.

Three Alaska tribes have another plan to fight COVID-19 and serve citizens.

Beyond a statistic: When the virus hits home

Minnesota Lt. Gov. Peggy Flanagan: Someone feeling well could still be carrying the virus … ‘then you walk past the next Ron, my big brother, in public’

Indian Country Today Reporters’ Roundtable, March 24

Five days tells the coronavirus story: Caseload jumps from two to 26

Researchers estimate that the undetected cases are “11 times more than has been officially reported”

The number of positive COVID-19 cases in the Navajo Nation grew from two on Tuesday night to 26 Saturday night. Five days.

Dancing for the people (virtually)

Zibaaska’iganagooday is the exploding sound in the Ojibwe language and it has a long history of healing

Community song and dance have always been a part of healing and prayer for Native people. In this time of social distancing, however, people are putting a digital spin on these healing traditions. People all over Indian Country are organizing virtual powwows and other social dances via social media as a means to offer hope and spiritual support during the Covid19 pandemic

Bored? This Indigenous list is for you

Swords, rez dogs, Indian Country adventures and more

Bored at home? Nonsense. Practicing safe social distancing during the coronavirus pandemic can also mean opportunity. We can finally catch up on all the streaming shows, Native YouTubers, read all the books we never have time for and listen to all the saved podcast episodes tucked away on our devices.

‘Native artists are resilient. We’ll get through this’

Native artists, musicians, comedians, actors and writers speak on careers affected by the COVID-19 virus. Freelance Artist Resources website hopes to provide relief

A week of hell (or business as usual?)

People are not taking COVID-19 serious, said Dean Seneca. Unfortunate if it takes mass casualties to ‘open people’s eyes

Homeless. Vulnerable. And no option for ‘self isolation’

American Indians and Alaska Natives clustered in camps or on the streets; ‘It’s been a crazy time’

Every major city has a virtual suburb for the homeless. Homes consisting of tents, scrap wood, shopping baskets and cardboard boxes. In shelters, a family dwelling might have a common kitchen and bedrooms with bunk beds. Others may have a large room filled with dozens of bunk beds or canvas cots. Some have dozens of rubber-coated thick pads placed a foot apart in rows laid across a concrete floor.

Spike reported in Navajo Nation cases

The number of positive COVID-19 cases in the Navajo Nation has grown to 14, a dramatic increase from the three confirmed cases reported only a day ago.

The announcement came hours after a 55-year-old Cherokee Nation citizen was the first coronavirus related death in Oklahoma. Before the Navajo Nation announcement late Thursday, March 19, there were nine cases confirmed in the Indian health system.

New data and a Cherokee Nation death

The Cherokee Nation and Oklahoma have confirmed the first COVID-19 related death, according to the Cherokee Phoenix. A 55-year-old Cherokee man died on March 18 after fighting a cold and then contracted the coronavirus disease.

The death of a tribal citizen that has been confirmed is one of the nine cases reported in the Indian health system as of March 19. On Wednesday, the Navajo Nation confirmed its third case, a 62-year-old Navajo man.

New cases at Lummi; long-term care facility outbreak traced back to sick workers

The Lummi Nation in Washington state has confirmed three positive COVID-19 cases, according to Tony Hillaire, chief of staff of the Lummi Indian Business Council. This adds to the total of seven within the Indian health system; one in the Portland Area of the Indian Health Service, one in the Great Plains area and two in the Navajo region.

Of the three Lummi cases, one is a Lummi citizen who resides on the reservation. The other two cases are residents of King and Whatcom counties.

 

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